Down and Out, Up and About. Rinse. Repeat

Listen to Jim’s podcast: 

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/downandoutupandaboutrinserepeat.mp3

or read his story below:

Down and Out, Up and About. Rinse. Repeat

 

“Huh, huh, huh! Cough! Huh!” The enormous woman sitting at the diner is in the loud throes of ecstasy or pain, her face contorted, eyes squinted, mouth agape. I look at the server and ask, “Does she need help?” not knowing whether tragedy has announced itself through the electronic device she is holding in her palm. The clerk glances to the side, sighs, and says, “No, she’s just laughing at something on the internet.” Turns out, she’s an employee on break and he is accustomed to her public uninhibited outbursts.

This day is like that–one moment I’m apprehensive, the next moment, I’m relieved. Each instant can turn from happy to sad to hopeful to depressing at the snap of a kismet or two.

At the shop, Peter Blackstock, senior editor at Grove Press in New York, tells me his assigned author, Viet Thanh Nguyen, has just this week won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. He’s elated and I’m thrilled to meet such a literary personage. Moments later, I’m informed via terse memo that I can no longer park my car in the store’s adjacent parking lot because the new owner just doesn’t want to lease space to merchants. One second I’m elated, the next moment I’m handed a new stressful challenge to find fresh parking digs. The peculiar thing is, on a cosmic scale, each of these contiguous events means absolutely nothing to much of anybody–that is, whether I’m happy or sad is nobody’s concern. But my body does not know the difference between meaningful and meaninglessness.

In a matter of seconds, I’m up and about, then down and out.

How do I shake off this tiger whose tail is super-glued to my hand, without getting disoriented about life?

Later on, a customer brings two enormous 19th-century illustrated books for appraisal. I am delighted to see the books and equally delighted to see the customer, with whom I graduated from school a century ago–or so it seems. But while examining the books, a sour-demeanor visitor enters and loudly proclaims–as if nobody else is conversing–that the Birmingham Arts Journal has made a serious mistake that must be corrected immediately before the Earth can continue rotating. As a Journal editor, I try to explain how publishing works, and how the problem can be addressed, while at the same time attempting to keep the customer happy and engaged in the appraisal process. The visitor closes his mouth but hovers within inches of my customer and me while I explain the books and their values.

Again, up and about, down and out, repeat themselves. All I can do is hang on to the tail, since the entire day goes on like this.

Down and out. Up and about.

I recall an old Madison Avenue advertising tale about the marketing of a hair shampoo. One Don Draper-type, searching for a way to increase sales, suggests that the instructions on each bottle be changed from, “Lather. Rinse Thoroughly.” to “Lather. Rinse Thoroughly. Repeat.” Turns out that, once implemented, these instructions helped double the sales of shampoo, and Draper lived to carouse another day.

Where are my instructions for getting through the up-and-down days?

“When Down and Out, Get Up and About. Repeat.”

In other words, there will forever be hills and valleys. I just have to keep in mind that over each hill there will be valleys, above each valley there will be hills. Navigating them is just part of each fractured day of a life well lived.

Even if life isn’t always that well-lived, pretending that it is can go a long way

 

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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The Sing-Song Woman Under the Rainbow

Listen to Jim’s podcast:  

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/thesingsongwomanundertherainbow.mp3

or read his story below:

THE SING-SONG WOMAN UNDER THE RAINBOW

The stilled afternoon breeze of Southside Birmingham is broken by a new sound.

Somewhere off in the distance you can hear something not quite like the other sounds of the street.

Not a car un-muffled, not a dog howling against the city’s loneliness, not a baby crying cribless.

It’s another sound, and it’s coming closer.

Somewhere over the rainbow, way up high.

There’s a land that I heard of once in a lullaby…

It’s becoming clear now. It’s a flat, rounded-tone voice, and it’s very precise and methodical.

It’s the sing-song woman.

She walks by a time or two a day, singing a different song each time.

If you knew Suzie like I know Suzie

Oh, oh, oh what a gal…

The songs are all old. But they are the songs you don’t easily forget once you’ve heard them clearly. The phrases are simple and clever, the thoughts are easy to grasp, and the voices that used to record them were not drowned out by highly amplified instruments and heavy beats.

Singin’ in the rain, just singin’ in the rain.

What a glorious feeling I’m happy again…

At first when you hear the sing-song woman, you feel your day has been intruded upon. The song is loud, and you can’t ignore it and go on about your work. The sing-song woman knows most of the words correctly, and you even learn a few more by listening to her.

 That old black magic has me in its spell,

That old black magic that you weave so well…

There she is, now. Her head is down. She dresses plainly and walks slumped and straight ahead. But her voice sounds out huskily and methodically.

First you say you will and then you won’t,

And then you say you do and then you don’t,

You’re undecided now, so what are you gonna do?

I don’t know anything about the sing-song woman. She’s like many others who wander around Southside Birmingham going no place in particular. Like many of the others, she doesn’t look around. But she doesn’t bother anybody, either.

I’m laughing at clouds so dark up above,

The sun’s in my heart and I’m ready for love.

The heart inside this weathered woman is still ticking. The spirit rises above her body and sings on its own:

Let the stormy clouds chase everyone from the place,

Come on with the rain, I’ve a smile on my face.

Whatever life has meted out to this Southside denizen, there’s something inside her that won’t stay down. She’s a bag lady whose bag is a wonderful lyric.

I’ll walk down the lane with a happy refrain,

And singin’ just singin’ in the rain.

Is this woman’s entire life lived in an old tune written by long-forgotten composer?

Why am I smilin’ and why do I sing?

Why does December seem sunny as Spring?

Why do I get up each morning to start

Happy and het up with joy in my heart?

Why is each new task a trifle to do?

Because I am living a life full of you.

The lover to whom she sings the song is not with her on these daily treks. Perhaps her lover no longer lives. Perhaps her lover never was.

But it is obvious that to the sing-song woman, her lover is as real as her song in the afternoon breeze

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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Curvature of the Attention Span

I am peering into the crowds of people surrounding me, somewhat lamenting the lost art of gazing into each others’ eyes.

In days far gone, people used to make momentary eye contact in passing, just long enough for a nod of recognition, a glimpse of friendliness, a symbol of trust and well-being.

Now, I am a stranger in a strange land.

No-one in sight is observing the world around them. They are all absorbed, focused, imbedded, part of the electronic devices they hold in their palms. Ignoring partners and friends, they are always Somewhere Else. Their bowed heads and bent spines pave the way for future professionals to minister unto them…chiropractors, orthopaedic surgeons, physical therapists, masseuses, masseurs, all will benefit from these aging technolusters who wonder how they became prematurely stooped, their thumbs arthritic, their distance vision awry, their observational powers limited by metal and plastic blinders.

Rooms full of people who are Somewhere Else. Stadiums of people who are Not Quite Here. Families filled with relatives all gazing navelward.

As I say, I am a stranger in a strange land, grateful for occasional moments when I meet other strangers who for some mysterious reason are not wedded to their palms, strangers who, like me, wish to engage and share and laugh with each other instead of laughing into a virtual unreality on a tiny screen.

Where do I find the happiness, the inspiration I seek, in a world of people who have gone away?

Well, it’s all there. All I have to do is what every artist, every writer, every poet has always done: Look around and examine everything that everybody else is ignoring.

The fact that pod people are self-absorbed leaves the rest of the world unobstructed for those of us who like to NOTICE. It’s actually kind of nice, being alone in a world full of people. I get all the time I need to peruse and browse and…NOTICE.

While much of the populace is busy text-shaming strangers, gossiping aimlessly with imaginary friends,  conducting snarky conversations about nothing of any particular importance, expressing opinions they’ve cut and pasted from others’ opinions…I get to have all the fun. 

Thanks, you behemoth media empire, thanks. You’ve freed up my time to observe more, write more, share more. You have provided me with my own space, space that is filled with actual people who are much larger than tiny screens and limited-character diatribes.

I get to see you as you are.

Do you ever see me as I am, I wonder

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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Two Queues in the Villages of Birmingham

Listen to Jim’s podcast:  http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/twoqueuesinthevillage.mp3

or read his story below:

Two Queues in the Villages of Birmingham

These two snapshots keep queuing up in my mind lately, so I have to own up to the lessons they are attempting to teach me. I do not yet know what they mean, but they are begging to be set free. Here they are:

First queue: I am standing in line behind two women at the thrift store check-out counter. I forget the old maxim that states the short line is always the slowest. Now I remember.

These two customers are standing next to shopping carts piled head-high with dozens of items, mostly clothing and shoes and household goods. The patient and unapologetic clerk takes her time methodically examining each item, entering a price in the register, calling for help from above when something is not priced, removing hangers, carefully rolling everything into bunches to be stuffed into white plastic bags, which the women move to the side in a protected heap.

This is taking a long time and my impatience is beginning to rise up. But on this particular day I remind myself that I can either enjoy this experience or make myself miserable. I opt to relax and observe. The petite women are very happy with their purchases and seem proud of their trove. After a while they look at the total tab, pull out rolls of cash and pay for everything in full. They leave the shop, laden with goodies and heading for a waiting van.

The clerk begins totaling my purchases while I ask her what all that clothing at one time is all about. “They are sending everything to their families in Mexico,” she said, for the first time smiling.” “Oh,” I say, feeling a bit ashamed of myself for being fidgety.

I leave the shop, wondering what those families will feel when they receive all these super gifts, what their expressions will be like as they sport their new old togs in a village far away from this particular Alabama village.

Second queue. I am again in line behind two women whose carts are brimming with clothing and household stuff and baby items.  The male clerk is slowly handling each item, removing hangers, making ad hoc bargains for those unmarked, focusing on doing a proper job. The women are chatting merrily. The first in line pays the clerk and remains at the counter while her companion begins handing things to the cashier.

Suddenly loud, funky and fun music emanates from her purse as she gropes for wallet and phone. I look over her bent head at the first customer and we spontaneously grin at each other, which inspires me to start faking some dance moves. She starts undulating, too, and her friend is now multi-tasking, taking in the dance, counting her money and answering her call. We can hear the male voice at the other end of the line.

“Where are you?” he barks.

“At the Piggly Wiggly,” she answers, causing her, the other customer, the clerk and me to crack up while stifling our guffaws.

“How much you spending?” he snarls.

“Oh, nothing,” she grins.

The conversation is over. The dance is done. The chuckles are mollified. The merchandise is paid for. The women leave.

The clerk and I watch them leave, each of us making up the sequel to a story we will never actually see.

I pay up, lift my bags, wish the cashier a great weekend. He returns the salutations.

I head from this village to the next village, ready for the next adventure

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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The Easter Egg the Easter Worm and Me

Listen to Jim’s podcast:

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/theeastereggtheeasterwormandme.mp3

or read his story below:

The Easter Egg the Easter Worm and Me

There is a glistening, squiggly brown earthworm hiding just under the Easter egg I’m grabbing from the damp red clay near my grandparents’ home in Peterson, Alabama, this bright sunny Sunday in Alabama, circa 1946.

Suddenly, my zeal in finding more treasure than cousins and siblings is placed on hold. Standing frozen, clutching the aqua-dyed hard boiled condiment in one hand and a small hand-woven basket in the other, I squint at the alien creature and wonder what it will do, now that I’ve exposed it to a larger reality.

I am regarding the earthworm, but I wonder whether it is regarding me.

It curls and stretches and begins burrowing into a deeper earth, so I decide that it has no interest in me and my Easter egg.

Which end is front, which is back? How does it eat? How does it even see?

I can’t help pondering during this extended moment. I know something special has happened, but I cannot quite express what that something special is.

Suddenly, I become the worm and begin feeling the soft red clay sliding past my extended exterior. It is getting darker as I leave the sunshine behind and head for home. Is my family waiting for me to relate my adventure? How will I explain my excitement? How will I describe objects that I cannot name?

“Ma, this gigantic roundish object was on the ground, and I thought I would hide beneath it for a time, but suddenly these five pudgy pale pink worms came down from the sky and just missed squashing me. They lifted the big round thing up to the sky and disappeared!”

What will Ma say when I tell her this? Will she dismiss the whole thing as something I dreamed up? Will she curl around me and comfort me till I settle down? Can she actually see in the dark?

“Jimbo! C’mon over here and let’s count your eggs,” cousin Jerry yells. I snap out of my tiny worm world and run over to other relatives and family to continue the Easter egg hunt.

Later that night, Mother gives me permission to eat the aqua-colored egg. As I crack and peel away the shell, the soft shiny white surface reminds me of the shiny earthworm family I’ll never get to know.

I silently nibble on the egg and pay secret respects to the critters that surround my small world…the worms that may become fish bait, the fish that may become food, the egg itself that might have become a baby chick…and the worms that, a few decades down the road, may become the diners rather than the dined

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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I’ll Never Forget the Day I Read a Book

I’ll Never Forget the Day I Read a Book

So…what is the first book you ever read?

What is the first book I ever read?

Allow me to crank up the Time Machine and get back to those thrilling days of yesteryear, when books slowly insinuated themselves into my life.

First thing I do is SEE a book. It’s over there, just within reach of my chubby little uncoordinated fingers. I can roll just a quarter-roll in my crib—that’s all it takes to see this unfocused blur of colors and shapes on the cover. All I know how to do is experience the book, not knowing that it can be read and manipulated. So, I do what I know how to do: lick the cover and gnaw at the corners. It tastes different than those mashed-up things they are feeding me. It would be even tastier if I could bite off a piece and swallow it, but that comes later.

So, first I SEE a book. Then I TASTE it. Then I masticate a bit. Then, I lose concentration and fixate on a wiggly toy that is hanging above me. I’ll get back to the book later.

Next thing I know, I’m snuggled up to my mother’s chest, experiencing the words she is reading to me as they vibrate the side of my face. I can HEAR her voice with one ear. I can FEEL her voice with the other. And then I note that she is gently turning the pages, causing the colorful shapes and strange markings to shift each time. I can hear her inflections of warmth, suspense, happiness, as the pages drift by.

Before I know it, I’m sitting up in my own wobbly fashion and turning the pages—not necessarily one at a time, not necessarily in any order. But I am doing the book the way I know how to do it. And, now and then, I even taste it again. I’ve been known to rub a crayon onto the paper to add color and design.

Time flies and now I’m reciting a book to my mother and sister, pretending that I’m reading it as the pages pass, but actually I still don’t know how to read, I’m just feeding back what I’ve heard them read aloud so many times. They play along with the ruse.

Now, at last, I am picking out a word or two in preparation for enrolling in the first grade. I’m excited about the prospect of actually making my way through the words with some degree of understanding. And, amazingly, after a while I start to read big-lettered words on my own.

What is the first book I can read without assistance? Hard to tell, since the books at school are not the same books we have at home. I’m reading some in both places. But in class, I get to read a Dick and Jane and Sally story all the way through! When I become an author many years later, I am jealous of those who wrote this reader. Wouldn’t you like to be the writer whose works can be recited by heart by millions of school kids? “See Dick run. Run, Dick, run!”

In middle age, I discover the song that comedian Jimmy Durante co-wrote and performed with gusto:

 There’s one day that I recall, though it was years ago.

All my life I will remember it, I know.

I’ll never forget the day a read a book.

It was contagious, seventy pages.

There were pictures here and there,

So it wasn’t hard to bear,

The day I read a book.

It’s a shame I don’t recall the name of the book.

It wasn’t a history. I know because it had no plot.

It wasn’t a mystery, because nobody there got shot.

The day I read a book? I can’t remember when,

But one o’ these days, I’m gonna do it again.

(Listen to Jimmy sing it, at the end of this column.)

Just yesterday, a pleasant family enters the shop, looking around and remarking upon the variety of things to read. One young girl is just tagging along, so naturally she’s the one I try to engage in conversation: “What do you like to read?” I ask, hoping to introduce some titles to her. She performs a sly smile and doesn’t answer because, like so many other children I meet these days, she knows her avid parents will answer for her. “Oh, she doesn’t read,” her father says. I know what he’s saying, but I play dumb just to see what kind of response I’ll get: “You mean she doesn’t know how to read?” I ask sympathetically. She grins even more deeply, waiting for her parent’s punchline. “No she just doesn’t like to read.”

I get it now. This lass has found a way to rebel against her parents, assert her own identity, appear cool to other kids. Normally, I get to talk up a book enough to inspire someone like her to try it, but I know there’s no way this can happen when hovering but well-meaning parents are there to puppet-master her conversation.

So, I say what I always say whenever the situation calls for it: “Oh, too bad. Mark Twain once said that a person who does not read has no advantage over one who can’t read.”

This is aimed at no-one in particular. The girl gets the joke but continues to play dumb. The parents remain perplexed.

What will no doubt happen—I’ve see it often—is she will discover a spicy novel proffered by a friend and, in secret, read it voraciously, becoming hooked on reading despite herself. She will, in the tradition of all kids, hide this novel and this fact from her parents as long as she possibly can.

The cycle goes on.

And maybe one day she’ll hear an old Jimmy Durante song and get excited all over again

Here’s Jimmy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLOR8gKwyoo

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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Falling Up the Stairs for Fifty Years or So

Listen to Jim’s podcast:

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/fallingupthestairsforfiftyyearsorso.mp3

or read his story below:

Falling Up the Stairs for Fifty Years or So

Just checking a list of the funniest things I’ve ever seen.

It’s the 1960′s, and I’m standing in the poolside doorway of my apartment in Alberta City, Alabama. To be exact, I live at Claymont Apartments just behind the bowling alley that is boldly called Leland Lanes. To the far right side of the obligatory chlorine-fragranced swimming pool I can see a small human figure swaying in the twilight shadows, silhouetted against the picture windows of each living unit.

I can make out who this human is, just from the way he holds himself. It’s Bill, the Tuscaloosa city planner who resides here. Normally, Bill is an engaging and lively conversationalist who takes his day job quite seriously. But on the weekends, and particularly on Saturday nights–this happens to be one of those Saturday nights–Bill pickles himself with a steady flow of beverages of the alcohol-content type. When Bill drinks, he remains sociable and smiling and harmless, but the lively discussions may wander about with less focus than usual.

Anyhow, this evening, Bill is weaving toward the stairs that lead to his second floor nest. His aim is true despite the meandering, and he raises his right foot to place it on the first step. He’s not holding onto the banister because his hands are protectively preoccupied with one bottle and one tumbler hugged to his chest.

Bill leans forward onto his right leg and raises his left leg, aiming to achieve either the same step or, optimistically, the second step. At this point, his leaning takes the appearance of toppling forward, face rapidly plunging toward the concrete surfaces. But then, a magical moment occurs. Instinctively cuddling both containers, Bill quickly raises his right foot in order to engage a third stair, thus saving his face but in the process failing to stabilize his downward fall. Rapidly struggling to remain erect, Bill lifts his left leg and manages to plant it on the fourth step just fast enough to again refrain from falling flat upon stairs and glassware.

Magically, Bill continues to fall forward at the same rate that  his legs effect the ascent and, like a slapstick comedian, he eventually arrives at the top of the flight, still wobbling, but vertical and unharmed.

I realize that time has stood still during this event. I haven’t breathed or averted my gaze. It happens so quickly that it takes me a while to absorb the physics of what I’ve just witnessed.

Bill wends his way toward his apartment or the next second-story party that he can find. I resume breathing and going about the business of hunkering down for the evening. Life goes on for another fifty years. Memories like this keep falling forward into my mind like a drunken friend, unable to self-destruct, unable to become forgettable.

I smile to myself and check the list to see what other funny reminiscences are hiding in stacks of notes and dictations.

There’s got to be a funny pony somewhere in there

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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One More Glance at Childhood

Listen to Jim’s podcast:

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/youcantellthatithurtsher.mp3

or read his story below:

One More Glance at Childhood

You can tell that it hurts her to bring me all this beautiful and nostalgic grammar
school stuff now and then. 

You can tell that it hurts her because she lingers after I’ve paid her for today’s trove,
she lingers and looks around at my walls and at my floor where the detritus of
humanity’s creative genius lies in stacks and piles and boxes and crates, stacks and
piles and boxes and crates of wonderful colorful playful deadly serious materials
from every generation since before and after the printing press. 

She smiles and looks longingly at the school materials she has just sold me: readers
and primers and felt figures and punch-out pieces that have never been punched out,
posters and circus banners and lovely lovely children’s items long disdained by
everybody but overgrown children like you and me. 

She no longer has enough room to store these glorious objects, and she wants to get
them into the hands of someone who’s more than a dealer/less than a dealer,
someone who will appreciate them and respect them and try to get them into the
right hands, and she has carefully chosen me as her heir, as her medium for passing
on the joyful notes of childhood. 

I pay her what I can afford to pay her, sometimes more than I can afford to pay her,
because I want her to keep coming back, coming back to see and pay respect to me,
coming back to bring me more surprises in the form of first-experience rushes to the
face as I open her treasure chests. 

And, too, I can tell that it hurts her to bring me all this beautiful stuff because she
tells me it hurts her, she tells me it hurts her, not in a whining voice, not in a sad
voice, but in a voice full of wisdom she has attained after a certain number of
unnameable years, wisdom she attained by being first stimulated and encouraged by
this vast array of paper ideas and paper feelings and paper joys and paper
ponderings. 

Our transactions are sacred and ceremonial.
I never thank her enough, she never stays long enough for one more extended and wistful goodbye to childhood

Butterfly Mummies, Long Ago Love Affairs and Four-Leaf Clovers

Listen to Jim’s podcast:

http://redclaydiary.com/mp3/butterflymummieslongagolove.mp3

or read his story below:

Butterfly Mummies, Long Ago Love Affairs and Four-Leaf Clovers

A lone customer sits huddled in the shadow of the old post office in the Museum of Fond Memories. She peers intensely at the open letter in her hands, a letter dated in pen and ink, “August, 1909.”

The carefully structured letter recounts, in several pages, a day in the life of the long-gone author, a narrative intended for the eyes and heart of the reader, who is simply named James. It’s a love note.

Earlier, the customer finds a postcard dated 1899, with “Wish you were here!” cheerfully signed by Alice, who is visiting St. Louis.  One small notebook reveals a four-leaf clover, pressed there in 1933. A butterfly wisps its way through the air and onto the floor. It is perfectly preserved inside a pamphlet on Manners, dated 1889. A 1952 telegram in the letter box announces with regret the death of a family member, an old dance card lists the signatures of men who once whirled the light fantastic with a seventeen-year-old girl, an envelope yields its contents–one silky bookmark with tassel, a tattered photograph from 1922 forever freezes in place the smiling faces of two young swim-suited moms at the beach with kids amok.

The customer, now lost in time, is in her third hour of trolling the generations. She is beginning to feel hunger, she knows there is much else to do outside this old bookstore, but she is reluctant to leave, now that these foundlings are begging to be adopted and nurtured.

She adds the love letter to her small affordable stack of paper ephemera, stands up to stretch, folds the metal chair and leans it in its place, then walks dreamily to the counter where the elderly proprietor awaits.

Her smile is sad and jubilant. “I love these things. I wish I could buy them all!”

The shopkeeper glows. “I’m so glad you appreciate these lives, and I’m even more glad that you plan to adopt them and keep them safe”

It is an idiosyncrasy of the owner that he views the contents of his shop as orphans awaiting the protection of adoptive parents. He is grateful that at least this one customer “gets” it.

The woman pays for her selections and clutches package and purse to her chest as she slowly heads for the front door. As she moves, she tenderly touches and examines other old memories, a frayed book, a newspaper clipping, an ancient valentine…and eventually exits the shop.

The proprietor walks over to the metal post office boxes, straightens up their corner a bit, moves a couple of potential obstructions, and thus prepares the area for a new customer.

He wonders what the next dreamer will be like

 

© Jim Reed 2016 A.D.

jim@jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com

http://www.jimreedbooks.com/podcast

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some wonderful old things we’ve sold of late

some wonderful old things we’ve sold of late

4-4-16 to 4-9-16

1 bible eraser

1 campaign button

Steinbeck. EAST OF EDEN

1 Highway 78 metal sign

1 merchant metal sign

OCCUPATIONAL TITLES

Vonnegut. PLAYER PIANO

JOHN BELL HOOD

Several old art titles

A large box of beautiful old book parts & letterheads (for artists)

4 art books

1 French Language Book

Capote. BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S

1 Marxist work

1 philosophy title

Gilbreth. 1 humor title

Pearl Buck. Her first book

1 old novel

Stephen King. 11-22-63

Several Lobby Cards & 1 poster from BEWILDERED YOUTH movie

Julia Child. 1 cookbook

3 old mystery novels

1 title about John Lennon

1 Rolling Stones book

1 old GRATEFUL DEAD LP

T.S. Eliot issue of SEWANEE REVIEW

THE CELESTINE PROPHECY

Thorne. LAST CHANCE FOR JUSTICE autographed

1 DENNIS THE MENACE collection

1 kids’ book

2 old medical books

Life Magazines with civil rights covers

Several vintage kids’ LPs

Several music works

Welty. A WRITER’S LIFE

PRINCESS AND THE GOBLIN mobile

Tolkien. HOBBIT

Wallace. INFINIT JEST

Juster. PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH

Several Shakespeare-related works

1959: May issue of Modern Man Magazine with June Wilkinson Cover  By Russ Meyer    Max Baer Feature   Illustrations By Glasser  Clementine Drew Centerfold By Bruno Bernard    Jane Dolinger

1960: April issue of Modern Man Magazine with  Jeanmarie Lussier Cover  Jack Brabham  Barbara Hines  martha Raye  Jane Dolinger Jayne Mansfield  Diane thornton Centerfold

Biemiller. STARBOY

Grace Livingston Hill. 1 title

1 Southern Living cookbook

1 Barbie poster

2 bookmarks

1 figure swizzle stick

Emilie Loring. 1 title

2 classical works

HIEROGLYPHS

1 MISTER BILL poster

1 SUPERMAN/CLARK KENT poster

Several horror collections

1 rock LP

2 LP recordings

Lord. A NIGHT TO REMMEBER

WEST SIDE STORY

ROMEO AND JULIET

E. Nesbit. 1 title

1 WILLIE NELSON bio

Several old science titles

2 Alabama civil rights/history titles

A number of military, wartime & gun titles

Several needlework titles

DRACULA leatlherbound

CHARLEY O

8 old paperback western novels

Miller. TROPIC OF CANCER

Old COMMERCIAL LAW book

CONFESSIONS OF AN OPIUM EATER

1 Russian-language limited edition miniature book, signed

Kerouac. ON THE ROAD

Allende. 2 novels

Kundera. 1 novel

MONUMENT TO AN ERA The Life and Art of Ben Hampton

1 England map

Several literary tomes

1 proverb book for kids

2 old western pulp magazines

HOW NOT TO WORRY ABOUT THE LOVE LIFE OF SPIDERS

2 HAPPY HOLLISTERS titles

Several childhood American history books

Many scholarly school titles

3 titles on/by T.S. Eliott

Gee. THE FRIENDLY HOUSE AND THE THRILLING ADVENTURES OF THE LITTLE MAN WHO BUILT IT

3 more obscure Tolkien titles

Wolfe. THE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID ACID TEST

MRS. PIGGLE WIGGLE

1 unabridged dictionary

Lewis Mumford. 1 title

Hemingway. 1 title

Lawrence. LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER

James Joyce. ULYSSES

Arthur C. Clarke. 2010

1 sci-fi title

Robert Bloch. STRANGE EONS

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE

4 old novels

THE GASTON MOTEL

1 Mariah Carey CD

3 old kids’ titles

HIGH WIND IN JAMAICA

THINK AND GROW RICH

Howard Thurman. THE CENTERING MOMENT

Kip. DOUBLE WITNESS OF THE CHURCH

4 CD’s

1 Poetry book by William Blake

Omar Sharif. Autobio

ALABAMA MOUNDS TO MISSILES

1 Doris Boyd Birmingham photo

1 kids’ book

1 kids’ monster book

Jane Austen. 1 title

THE MARKS OF AN EDUCATED MAN

Several LP recordings

1 rock & roll print

Wolfe. YOU CAN’T GO HOME AGAIN

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS STORYBOOK

ANDY KAUFMAN bio

1 thriller paperback

TRAVELS OF BARTRAM

1 war history

1 sci-fi title

Guterson. SNOW FALLING ON CEDARS

Bill Bryson. I’M A STRANGER HERE

FIRST GRADE READER

Perry. WOMEN OF HOMER

Dante. DIVINE COMEDY

Harris. MIRACLE IN BIRMINGHAM

Peale. POWER OF POSITIVE THINKING

Griffin. BLACK LIKE ME

1930: August 11 Issue of Time Magazine With Cover Photo of Duchess of York Plus Inside photo of Edward of Wales Plus Review of LONE COWBOY By Will James

1935: February 23 issue of Liberty Magazine with Cover Illustration of Blonde Skiing Near a Guy Crashing  Plus Article on Grace Moore

15 Birmingham postcards

THE VALLEY AND THE HILLS

4 small doodads

1 framed bas relief man

Scott. ROB ROY

TASSO’S JERUSALEM DELIVERED

3 LPs

3 Buddhist tracts

THE INNOCENT MRS. DUFF AND DEATH IN THE LIMELIGHT AND THE TROUBLE AT TURKEY HILL

1960: Vol 2 # 1  Candida Magazine

FAIRY TALES

Several novels

ANIMAL FARM

1 old print

TIN-TIN

MEIN KAMPF

Talbot Mundy. 2 titles

CHARLIE O.

MR. MCGUFFEY’S READERS

Many old glossy publicity photos

Several old prints

Dante. DIVINE COMEDY

Several CDs

1 Donald Trump CD

Several old comic books

1 Newsweek Magazine on racism

Bunches of kids’ prints & Disney comic books

THE IMMIGRANT LEFT IN THE UNITED STATES

Hemingway. OLD MAN AND THE SEA

Davis. ONE MAN’S WAY

Johnson. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN X-COLORED MAN

RECONSTRUCTION IN THE SOUTH

REPORT OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE

Hinton. OUTSIDERS

Hammett. MALTESE FALCON

2 WIMPY KID BOOKS

Matheson. I AM LEGEND

1 lighted Santa figure

Windham. SOUTHERN COOKING TO REMEMBER

Several classical & Asian LPs

1 modern cookbook

1 religious tract

4 Eloise Wilkins-illustrated books

Several old children’s fairy-tale titles

Darwin. ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES

2 turn-of-century titles

NATURAL PERFUME MATERIALS A Study of Concretes Resinoids Floral Oils and Pomades

COME LET US CHANGE THIS WORLD Selections from Maudoodi’s Writings

Conroy. MY LOSING SEASON signed

1 large piece of quartz

1 leatherbound Darwin

3 pinup prints

3 vintage Hardy Boys titles

4 old Wrestling magazines

3 Birmingham Postcards

Stewart. ROSE COTTAGE

Box of Tarot Cards

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

Brinkley. WORLD WAR 11 AXIS ASSAULT

Watkins. GREAT DEPRESSION

Morris. MARCUS DUPREE

2 Birmingham postcards

CALL TO DUTY

A number of editions of The Tao

Dream books

Poetry titles

1 galaxy calendar

Kathryn Tucker Windham. 2 ghost books

Frank Herbert. 3 titles

1 LOLITA soundtrack LP

Ginsberg. 1 title

1 current novel

2 military titles

1 old kids’ series hardback

2 eggs with prizes

5 Kentucky cookbooks

Haggard. KING SOLOMON’S MINES

2 poetry titles

Thorne. NOAH’S WIFE signed

1 book about cats

BRAIN SEX

Bunches and gobs of Little Golden Books and Wonder Books

UNCLE REMUS STORIES

Erich Fromm. 1 title

1 large old metal Sinclair Oil sign

1958: October 27 issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of College of Cardinals St. Peter’s Plus Synagogue Bombing in Atlanta Plus Boris Pasternak

1 old 1950′s Life Magazine

1 nature book

1 old novel

De Saint-Exupery. 1 title

Pynchon. 1 title

Several classic titles

THE ALCHEMYST

Edgar Allan Poe. WORKS OF

1 small old leatherbound title

Bradbury. FAHRENHEIT 451

Hill. THINK AND GROW RICH

BLINK

1955: August Issue of Playboy Magaine with Mermaid Cover Photo & Charles Beaumont & Dave Brubeck & P. G. Wodehouse & Leroy Neiman

Armes. THE STORY OF COAL AND IRON IN ALABAMA 1972 Facsimile edition of the Original Book

Several aeronautical pieces

1 old self-help title

Ross MacDonald. 4 thrillers

1 Jack Reacher title

Robert Jordan. 2 hardbacks

Several sci-fi titles

Old optometry book

1 old Arthurian title

4 vintage automobile posters

1 old Life Magazine

2 Spanish language titles

Robert Frost. 1 title

Reed. DAD’S TWEED COAT signed

Entrekin. CASTING FOR THE CUTTHROAT

Harper. LOVE SONGS FROM PSYCHOPATHS

2 OZ books

Kin. 11-22-63

Several classic novels

THE RIVER CONGO

AURORA DAWN

2 old Boy Scout calendars

THIRTEEN TENNESSEE GHOSTS AND JEFFREY

JEFFREY INTRODUCES 13 MORE SOUTHERN GHOSTS

Stephen King. 3 vintage titles

SHREK

Dr. Seuss. 1 title

Bradbury. DANDELION WINE

CLARA BARTON

Dick. MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE

Jack London. STORIES OF

Burke Davis. JEB STUART

WORKS OF H.G. WELLS

1 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. title

Chesterton. MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY

Harper Lee. GO SET A WATCHMAN

1 old cookbook

2 classic novels

THE SCARLET LETTER red leather binding

Graham Hancock. 1 title

Tim Callahan. 1 title

PHENIX CITY: THE WICKEDEST CITY IN AMERICA

WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE leatherbound

1 kid book

1 large poseable Superman doll

Silverstein. WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS

Several Birmingham postcards

Whitman. LEAVES OF GRASS

1 old Southern cookbook

Maya Angelou. 1 title

3 kids’ books

1 Disney DVD

Spyri. HEIDI

3 old novels

Orwell. 1984 & ANIMAL FARM

Heinlein. STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND

Collins. MOCKINGJAY,  HUNGER GAMES

3 SCI-FI KID BOOKS

NINE-MILE SWAMP A Story of the Loomis Gang

Lumley. Several sci-fi titles

A number of fantasy & sci-fi books

Balzac. 1 title

1 old novel

Victor Hugo. 1 novel

1 Native American title

1 book about MARILYN MONROE

A number of old postcards

Matheson. THE SHRINKING MAN

2 old leatherbound photo albums

A number of old snapshots

Willie Nelson. A TALE OUT OF LUCK

Stephens. A FEW THOUGHTS

1888: May 29  Harper’s Young People  Gilbert Gaul  James Buckham  George Makepeace Towle  Lucy C. Lillie  Herr brockmann’s Wonderful Performers  Charles Ledyard Norton  Allan Forman  margaret Johnson  Margaret E. Sangster  Charles henry Webb

1970: THE WRETCHED MESS CALENDAR

MacDonald. PRINCESS AND THE GOBLIN

Rowling. HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE

WATERSHIP DOWN

McCarthy. THE ROAD

Travers. Several Mary Poppins titles

Warner. Several Boxcar Children titles

Alice Hoffman. 1 title

WHERE THE RED FERN GROWS

1 antique men’s clothing sign

1 old metal sign

Reed. DAD’S TWEED COAT signed

1952: KODAK Yearbook of EAU CLAIRE HIGH SCHOOL IN WISCONSIN

1971: March 22 Time Magazine with Cover Illustration of George C. Scott

THE MOORES CREEK BRIDGE CAMPAIGN, 1776 (SIGNED & INSCRIBED BY THE AUTHOR)

Bradbury. DANDELION WINE

1 novel

Martin. THE DOLL PEOPLE

Camus. 3 titles

2 Zen books

1 stack of vintage early paperbacks

Capote. 1 title

Heller. CATCH 22

2 novels

Coleridge. RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER

1 fantasy title

EXPERIMENT IN GERMANY

2 novels

Poe. COMPLETE STORIES

Raymond Carver. 1 title

Salinger. CATCHER IN THE RYE

Kesey. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST

Freud. 3 titles

1 kid story book

Samuel Smiles. 1 title

Dante. THE DIVINE COMEDY

LITTLE BLACK SAMBO

2 kids’ books

Several kids’ LP story recordings

WHISTLING MOUNTAIN MYSTERY

1 DVD

3 Christian books

5 Football Programs University of ALabama

Strode. JEFFERSON DAVIS AMERICAN PATRIOT (signed)

Stephen King. 2 titles

Sesame Street. RUBBER DUCKY 45rpm

Browne. HISTORY OF FOREST PARK

Moody. BOB MOODY’S BIRMINGHAM

Groom. AVIATORS

Stevenson.  TWO MRS. ABBOTS

Dahl. THE BFG

COFFEE WITH GROUCHO

THORNHOLD

1 old watch

Travers. MARY POPPINS OF CHERRY TREE LANE

Windham. JEFFREY’S LATEST 13

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

MAGIC TREEHOUSE

GUIDE TO PHYSICAL FITNESS

1942: August issue of Country Gentleman Magazine  with Cover Illustration By Thomas Hart Benton of Blacks Picking Cotton

1962: May 25 Issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of Prince Juan Carlos Wedding Plus LOLITA Movie Plus Ray Bolger

1 original PAC MAN manual

1 large linen-covered children’s picture book

1 sci-fi tv series book

Wouk. AURORA DAWN

2 WIMPY KID titles

1 art design book

MY BOOKHOUSE several volumes

2 RICK BRANT titles

King. TENNIS TO WIN

BILL TALBERT’S WEEKEND TENNIS

BRADEN’STENNIS FOR THE FUTURE

HOW TO PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS

William Faulkner. 1 title

D.H. Lawrence. 1 title

1 Gershwin album

1 color slide

1 photo negative

MARLEY & ME

IN THE HAND OF DANTE

Primo Levi. 1 book

THE NEGRO IN THE MAKING OF AMERICA

2 trading cards

Several pieces of paper ephemera

1 large art book

Lawrence. SEVEN PILLARS OF WISDOM

Tolkien. THE HOBBIT

1 Frank Sinatra LP

1969: February 10 issue of Sports Illustrated  Magazine with Cover Photo of Basketballer Bud Ogden

3 old copies of Sports Illustrated

F. Scott Fitzgerald. 1 title

Several popular novels

BIRMINGHAM SKETCHES FROM 1871 THROUGH 1921

TANNEHILL GHOST STORIES AND OTHER SELECTED SHORTS

Life Magazine with Roy Campanella on cover

1965: July 30 Issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of Mickey Mantle plus  Oskar Werner & Shirley Temple’s Daughter  & Bogallusa Race Demonstrations

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

HISTORY OF GEORGIA

3 LPs

LITTLE BLACK SAMBO

1 nursery rhyme book

1 poetry gift book

LANEY LINEAGE

LITTLE QUEEN ESTHER

FORBIDDEN FAMILY

1 bound volume of 1933 British movie magazines

1 Mario Lanza LP

1 Limelighters LP

1 old TARZAN comic book

1 old DENNIS THE MENACE comic

SAD SACK &SGT. BILKO comics

2 JUNIOR CLASSICS comics

Revolutionary War LP recording

1 NARNIA hardback

e.e. cummings. Complete poems

1 wartime novel

Several popular titles

A DREAM COME TRUE Volume 1 THE STORY OF MADISON COUNTY AND INCIDENTALLY OF ALABAMA AND THE UNITED STATES

Portis. TRUE GRIT

ROBIN HOOD

SHANE

THE LONE RANGER RIDES AGAIN

1 book about fruit

SAHARA

BLACK VOICES

Raines. MY SOUL IS RESTED

JAZZ IN JULY CD

Giddings. WHEN AND WHERE I ENTER

1941: March 3 Time Magazine   Gary Cooper Cover

LITTLE QUEEN ESTHER

1 cigarette advertising mirror

1 folding chair/cane

ALABAMA RAILROADS

Raines. FLY FISHING THROUGH THE MID-LIFE CRISIS

8 NARNIA related titles

1 mystery novel

1 very large USA map

2 CD’s

COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT SINCE 1946

1 large Tarzan print

1 Alabama refrig magnet

Ryan. THE LAST BATTLE

CONFESSIONS OF AN ECONOMIC HIT MAN

1966: March 25 Issue of Life Magazine with LSD cover Plus astronauts  & Gwen Verdon

Rick Bragg. 1 new title

1 cookbook

1 fantasy novel

HANK WILLIAMS

Wayne Flynt. POOR BUT PROUD

.

Morgan. A TIME TO SPEAK

1969: April 30 Catalog for FREDERICK’S OF HOLLYWOOD

Faulkner. 1 title

Twain. TOM SAWYER

GREEK MYTHS

Douglas Adams. 1 title

A dozen vintage sci-fi titles

PECULIAR CHILDREN

Milosz. 1 collection

1 JIM MORRISON title

Sach. MAN WHO MISTOOK HIS WIFE FOR A HAT

Walker Percy. 2 titles

Wodehouse. 2 titles

C. Wright Mills. POWER POLITICS AND PEOPLE

Lasch. REVOLT OF THE ELITES

Deutscher. THE PROPHET (Trotsky)

2 old prints

1 old comic book

1 GOOSEBUMPS title

3 mysteries

1968: March 29 issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo Full-Length shot of Jane Fonda as Barbarella in space Suit

1972: June 9 Issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of Bella Abzug Plus George McGovern & Czar Nicholas & Anastasia Plus Duke of Windsor Death plus Review of “black” Films BUCK AND THE PREACHER & THE LEGEND OF NIGGER CHARLEY & SOUL SOLDIER & COOL BREEZE

1969: March 7 issue of Life Magazine with Cover photo of Richard Nixon in Crowd of Berliners

1 popular mystery

2 old magazines

2 transcendentalist titles

3 business titles

historical Notes farrar Lodge No. 8 f & A M Organized March 5, 1821 Sesquicentennial Celebration birmingham Alabama June 12 1971

Philip K. Dick. 1 title

Langston Hughes. 1 collection

Ferlinghetti. 1 poetry book

1 stereopticon card

1 1911 tabloid

1 local humor book

FAHRENHEIT 451

Several classic novels

Isom NEWSPAPER BOY

Stevenson. DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE

Churchill. PAINTING AS A PASTTIME

1 Disney DVD film

Heinlein. STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND

Several medical titles

WHERE THE BOYS ARE cover Connie Francis (2 copies)

2006: October Issue of Art in America Magazine Featuring Articles on Samuel Palmer, David Smith, Jenny Holzer, Josiah McElheny, Betye Saar, Nicole Eisenman, Sasika Olde Wolbers, Frances Barth

THE SERPENT SLAYER

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3-15-16 to 3-21-16

Bio of the Wright brothers

1 entymology reference book

1 history title

1 book on the Irish

Several old key chains

John Crowley. 1 title

Several titles on Robert E. Lee & other historical figures

Several Asian prints

Several classic sci-fi titles

2 old maps

2 Tolkien titles

3 old Sports Illustrated magazines

3 etiquette books

1 toy

Roark Bradbord. 2 titles

1 old photo

THE SHIPPING NEWS

CLARA BARTON RED CROSS PIONEER

VIRGIL GRISSOM

NURSES THREE

ANGEL OF MERCY

STORY OF CLARA BARTON

3 Civil War prints

Heinlein. 3 titles

Several Civil War titles

2 old Alabama road maps

Tolkien. MR. BLISS

Capote. IN COLD BLOOD

Bill Bryson. 1 title

L’Engle. 1 title

Milne. 2 titles

Tolkien. THE SILMARILLION

2 old comic books

1 poetry title

1 horror comic book

1 photo of George & Lurleen Wallace

1952: February 25 issue of Life Magazine

Weitzman. SUPER POWER

1962: February 23 issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of Shirley MacLaine Plus Articles on Sonny Liston & charles Addams

DELMAR’S DELIGHTS: SEAFOOD RECIPES

THREE YEARS IN THE SOUTHERN ARMY

Dyer. “FIGHTIN’ JOE” WHEELER

Toole. CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES

BRIDGES

GREAT GATSBY

1 novel

LORD OF THE FLIES

Carl Sagan. COSMOS

THE PLAGUE

Several philosophy titles

Walker Percy. 2 titles

3 books on jazz

WIT & WISDOM OF HARRY TRUMAN

Imhof. ALABAMA BIRDS

1 leaf poster

9 Birmingham postcards

2 OLD PRINTS

2 Little Leather Library volumes

1 old shoe ad

3 Publicity Photos

3 Bumper Stickers

LITTLE BLACK SAMBO

1 James Bond title

TALES OF UNCLE REMUS (1896 EDITION)

Damon Runyon. POEMS FOR MEN

Sherman Alexie. BUSINESS OF FANCYDANCING

MODERN POETRY FROM AFRICA

Szybist. GRANTED

Ashbery. APRIL GALLEONS

3 mysteries

1 rock bio

1 IKE lapel pin

REYNARD THE FOX

Mircea Eliade. MYTH AND REALITY

1968: April 19 issue of Life Magazine with Mrs. Martin Luther King at Funeral Service, the impact of Martin Luther King plus Reviews of THE LATENT HETEROSEXUAL & BELLE DE JOUR Plus Part 3 of Egypt Series

1971: March 5 Issue of Life Magazine with Cover photo of Muhammad Ali & Joe Frazier & articles on Lt. Calley & Timothy Dalton as Heathcliff

Two American history books

1 old Life Magazine (Marilyn Monroe)

DAD’S TWEED COAT autographed

Dostoyevsky. NOTES FROM THE UNDERGROUND

THE BOY MECHANIC Book 2 1000 THINGS FOR BOYS TO DO

1865: November Issue of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (MAGAZINE IS DISBOUND BUT COMPLETE) with ascent of Popocatepetl & HOW TO REDEEM WOMAN’S PROFESSION FROM DISHONOR & RECOLLECTIONS OF GENERAL ROUSSEAU (Civil War) & OUR MUTUAL FRIEND By Charles Dickens

1 Nazi history title

Steve Martin. SHOP GIRL

Steinbeck. GRAPES OF WRATH

Adams. 1 DILBERT book

1 book on rocks

VELVETEEN RABBIT

1 small art book

1 small old leatherbound title

1969: March 14 issue of Life Magazine with Cover Photo of Apollo 9 LEM Rocket

Keyes. FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON

Bradbury. ILLUSTRATED MAN and MEDICINE FOR MELANCHOLY

CRYSTAL SHIP

Russel. BERTRAM RUSSELL’S BEST

Freud. CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS

Rand. ATLAS SHRUGGED

3 Matt Groening titles

3 modern mysteries

Reed. DAD’S TWEED COAT signed

Rumi. POETRY

Emerson. COLLECTED WORKS

Stephen King. 1 title

1 2000 Elvis calendar

1 book about London

Cohen. CHILD OF EVIL (first Published Serially as THERE’S ALWAYS A NEXT TIME) & I LOVE YOU AGAIN (later title was THERE’S ALWAYS TIME TO DIE)

Terrill. MAO A Biography

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3-8-16 to 3-12-16

1 very old newspaper

2 LP recordings

Peter Arno. 1 collection

Tolkien. 1 bio

Hemingway. STORIES

Darwin. ORIGIN OF THE SPECIES

Some prize-filled eggs

Edgar Allan Poe. 1 title

2 novels

IVANHOE

MARIE ANTOINETTE

BEN HUR

Newell. THE HOLE BOOK

OLDEST LIVING CONFEDERATE WIDOW TELLS ALL

ALABAMA history

LASSIE Big Little Book

LITTLE WOMEN

KIDNAPPED

C. Day Lewis. 1 collection

20 VHS episodes of INSPECTOR MORSE

3 old books

1 old recipe pamphlet

3 contemporary mystery novels

1 kid magic book

Umberto Eco. 1 title

Pohl. SPACE MERCHANTS

1 unabridged dictionary

2 philosophy references

A bunch of philosophy & feminist titles

Freud. 1 title

Thomas Mann. 1 title

Truman Capote. BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S

A CANTICLE FOR LEIBOWITZ

Jack Douglas. 1 title

Several kids’ science books

Walter Scott. 2 volumes of poetry

Several classics

1 19th-century cookbook

1 Birmingham history

Walt Kelly. 1 POGO collection

Kopp. NO HIDDEN MEANINGS

ORAL SURGERY

MODERN MASTERS OF ETCHING JAMES MCNEILL WHISTLER

Stephen King. 1 title

1 James Joyce biography

2 murder mysteries

Welty. COLLECTED STORIES

Hudson. GREEN MANSIONS

Benson. MAKE WAY FOR LUCIA

15-MINUTE LOW-CARB RECIPES

WRITINGS OF ALBRECHT DURER

PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR

SWISS MEDIEVAL TAPESTRIES

JAMES MCNEILL WHISTLER

A BODY OF DIVINITY, OR THE SUM AND SUBSTANCE OF CHRISTIAN RELIGION (Sixth Edition, “corrected and Much Enlarged By the Author) 1670

Bill Bryson. 1 title

John Steinbeck. 1 title

NAZI GERMANY

Several WWII books

WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE

Tennyson. 1 ancient book of verse

Gardner. THE LOST BOYS

Pauline Kael. Book on film criticism

Fran Lebowitz. 1 title

INDEPENDENT FILMS

2 old prints

Schroeder, Doris. GUNSMOKE Big Little Book

2 Star Trek collections

1 old tinted print

Harry Crews. 1 title

ALABAMA’S BEST RESTAURANTS COOKBOOK

1 current novel

HAMILTON. mythology

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS

Stribling. THE STORE

FEAR GOD

Hoving. 2 titles

Several bartending guides

2 old cookbooks

ROBERT’S RULES OF ORDER

Look & Life magazines from the 1950′s

1945: RUSSELL’S SOUTHEAST BUS AND HOTEL GUIDE Alabama Florida Georgia Kentucky Louisiana Mississippi North Carolina South Carolina Tennessee Virginia West Virginia

Enid Blyton. 2 Noddy books

1 prize egg

Lee. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (signed)

Elie Wiesel. 1 title

1937: December  Fiction Parade and Golden Book  G.k. Chesterton   walter brooks Story FORTUNE BECKONS MR. BEED  author of freddy the pig

1945: JUNE 23 SATURDAY EVENING POST George S. Patton Article

Plath. THE BELL JAR

2 classic novels

William Faulkner. 1 title

Several classical authors

1 French title

1 book of poetry

Picard. MARRIAGE IS MURDER

Harris. WHAT ANGLES FEAR

Walker. CAN’T KEEP A GOOD WOMAN DOWN

ANTHOLOGY OF MODERN POETS

MODERN AMERICAN POETS

WORDSWOTH

Silverstein. WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS

Whitman. LEAVES OF GRASS

Allende. 1 title

Dr. Seuss. 1 title

Several novels

PEER GYNT

Several classics

Mart Twain. 1 volume

HISTORY OF JAMES BOND

Whitman. LEAVES OF GRASS

Faulkner. UNVANQUISHED

Mosley. RL’s DREAM

ODE TO BIILLY JOE

Douglas. SERPENT WIFE

FEAR GOD AND WALK HUMBLY

1 kid book

1 art book

Several old hymnals & spellers

Iceberg Slim. PIMP

Robertson. GREATEST THING

1921: COROLLA YEARBOOK OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

1922: COROLLA Yearbook of the University  of Alabama

A COLLEGE PRIMER OF WRITING

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2-29-16 to 3-5-16

1 refrig magnet

Rilke. Several titles

Dylan Thomas. 1 title

Omar Khayyam. THE RUBAIYAT

3 old math books

2 old mysteries

1 Zen book

THE ANNOTATED ALICE

A TOLKIEN BESTIARY

John Steinbeck. 1 title

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S DVD film

Edgar Allan Poe. TALES

Heinlein. DOOR INTO SUMER

Many, many Little Golden Books & Wonder Books & Disney Books

Several old prints

Norman Rockwell. 1 collection

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST (3 copies)

1 old Life Magazine (Kim Novak cover)

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

CATCHER IN THE RYE

Several old school readers

PRINCE OF FROGTOWN

ARAB JACK the Adventures of a London Boy in The Soudan  dime Novel One Shilling Colorful action Cover Art

Several vintage PEANUTS cartoon collections

1 other cartoon collection

SONG OF THE SEA FROM RUDYARD KIPLING’S VERSE

1 novel

THE CLASS OF ’42 MARINES IN WW II

POOR RICHARD’S ALMANACKS

1 knitting book

1 sewing book

O YE JIGS AND JULEPS!

DOVIE

2 black history titles

CHOCTAW COUNTY CHRONICLES A History of Choctaw County Mississippi

Ferrol Sams. 1 title

1 old menu

George Bush. 1 title

1 African title

Several philosophy & history titles

2015: November 1 issue of New York Times Book Review Magazine

1 satire

Wallace Stevens. 1 title

12 Tolkien titles

3 large foreign wall maps

2 Harry Potter novels

Sheet Music for CHOPSTICKS WITH VARIATIONS FOR PIANO By John Thompson

1 astronomy book

Abner Dean. 1 title

Carl Jung. 1 title

Map of the heavens

THE LEADERSHIP GAP

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2-22-16 through 2-27-16

.Jakes. THE FORTUNES OF BRAK

THE ANARCHIST COOKBOOK

Lee. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

Jules Verne. 1 title

Agatha Christie. 2 titles

2 large photo books on Alabama

Ogden Nash. 1 title

BIRMINGHAM THEN AND NOW

1 philosophy books

Stephen King. 1 title

1 35mm slide

Shakespeare. 1 title

Ray Bradbury. 3 titles

King. THE SHINING

3 century-old novels

1 POW bracelet

Several middle eastern-language titles

Several German language title

THE ECONOMICS OF TAXATION

1914: May 30 Issue of Collier’s Magazine with Cover Art By J. C. Leyendecker of Soldier Playing Taps & Jack London Article & Back Page ad for Nyal’s Face Cream

MAGNOLIA SPRINGS COOKBOOK

Many works of philosophy and history

Many copies of Elsie Dinsmore books by Martha Finley

1 Disney DVD film

Philip K. Dick. 1 title

H. P. Lovecraft. 1 title

Isaac Asimov. 1 title

Abbot. FLATLAND

A stack of Soldier of Fortune Magazines

Several war histories

Hamilton. THE ROMAN WAY

Steinbeck. THE RED PONY slipcased

Washington Irving. 1 leatherbound title

LIVING WELSH

POETRY ON FOURTH

Hardy. RETURN OF THE NATIVE

2 FRENCH NOVELS

Mitchell. GONE WITH THE WIND

5 Birmingham postcards

1 Bham refrig magnet

3 LP albums (HOMER & JETHRO, JACKSON BROWNE, CHARLIE BYRD)

1 kids’ board book

2 show biz books

8 MAD MAGAZINES

12 MAD PAPERBACKS

Twain. GREAT SOTRIRES

neilsen. LITTLE GREEN HANDBOOK

Duckett. RAPS

Bukowski. PEOPLE LOOK LIKE FLOWERS IN THE SPRING

1947: September “See” Magazine with cover Color Photo of Myra Keck in Red Swimsuit & spread on john Garfield & Lilli Palmer in “Body & Soul”

1968: June 28 Issue of Life Magazine with Jefferson Airplane cover  Okys Frabj Zapp Artucke

Lots of very old German-language books

Several philosophy titles

VIRGIL’S AENEID

Robinson. COLLECTED POEMS

Bancroft. MISCELLANIES

AN ALABAMA CHRISTMAS signed

DAD’S TWEED COAT signed

Robert McCammon. 2 titles

Truman Capote. 2 titles

Agatha Christie. 2 titles

CIVIL WAR TO CIVIL RIGHTS A Pictorial History of Selma Alabama

Flannery O’Connor. COMPLETE STORIES

William Faulkner. AS I LAY DYING

Andrew Glaze. OVERHEARD AT THE DRUG STORE

Robert Burns. COMPLETE WORKS

Irene Latham. COLOR OF LOST ROOMS autographed

MINIATURES OF MODERN ARTISTS a Miniature Book

Truman Capote. 4 titles

Toni Morrison. 3 titles

2 civil rights works

1 needlework title

Vonnegut. SUN MOON STAR

Puzo. THE GODFATHER

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S DVD film

Several old cooking pamphlets

DULLES bio

JFK bio

Two presidential histories

Turgenev. FATHERS AND SONS

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

1 Old Print

CALDER art book

Gymnastics book

1 book on pirates

1 book on presidents

Rudyard Kipling. 1 title

Several kids’ books

Recipes and Lore from Each Alabama County AROUND THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE from the Alabama Legislative Wives Club 1975-1979 Cookbook

Brown. ALABAMA MOUNDS TO MISSILES

Bledsoe. AN ESSAY ON LIBERTY AND SLAVERY

1958 Lobby Card Color scene from TARZAN’S FIGHT FOR LIFE Depicting Gordon Scott with Jane and boy, who is Holding Spears

Leslie Ford. RENO RENDEZVOUS

HISTORY OF ALABAMA AND INCIDENTALLY OF GEORGIA AND MISSISSIPPI FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD with index laid in